People

People

Anne Merrild Hansen, Director

Professor of Social Science, Arctic Oil and Gas
Institute of Social Science, Economics & Journalism
E-mail: anmh@uni.gl

    

Anne (1)

 

Anne Merrild Hansen is Professor of Social Science, Arctic Oil and Gas Studies at Ilisimatusarfik, Associate Professor in Environmental Assessment and the Arctic at Aalborg University, Denmark, and a Fulbright Arctic Initiative scholar 2015-2016 with University of Alaska, Fairbanks. She is also a member of the regional ‘Adaptation Actions for a Changing Arctic’ team on Baffin Bay – Davis Strait for the Arctic Council. She has published widely on impacts assessments related to extractive industries, social indicators and determinants of wellbeing in the Arctic. Anne specialises in participatory and engaging research practices. She is a member of the International Association for Impact Assessment. Anne holds a PhD in environmental planning (2011) and a MSc in Engineering (2002) from Aalborg University.

 

Rachael Lorna Johnstone, Director

Professor of Law, Arctic Oil and Gas
Institute of Social Science, Economics & Journalism
E-mail: ralo@uni.gl

    

Rachnr 1 Crop

 

Rachael Lorna Johnstone is Professor of Law, Arctic Oil and Gas Studies at Ilisimatusarfik (University of Greenland) and Professor of Law at the University of Akureyri, Iceland. Rachael specialises in Polar law: the governance of the Arctic and the Antarctic under international and domestic law. She is the author of Offshore Oil and Gas Development in the Arctic under International Law: Risk and Responsibility (Brill 2015) and has published widely on the rights of indigenous people; international human rights law; international environmental law; due diligence; state responsibility; and Arctic strategies. She is a member of the Arctic Law Thematic Network of the University of the Arctic and the International Law Association Study Group on Due Diligence. Rachael holds a doctorate in juridical science from the University of Toronto (2004), an MA in Polar Law from the University of Akureyri (2014), an LLM in Legal Theory from the European Academy of Legal Theory (2000) and an LLB(Hons) from the University of Glasgow (1999).

 

Birger Poppel

Emeritus
Institute of Social Science, Economics & Journalism 
Department of Social Sciences, Economics & Business
E-mail: bipo@uni.gl

    

Birger -poppel _120x 129

 

Birger Poppel is Project Chief, emeritus, and international coordinator of the Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic, SLiCA at Ilisimatusarfik, the University of Greenland. He holds an MA in Economics. He served as Chief Statistician from 1989-2004 and has since 2004 been affiliated with Ilisimatusarfik. His primary research interests are living conditions of Inuit, Sami and other indigenous peoples of the Arctic; the economic, social, cultural and political development in the Arctic region and how the development is most adequately measured and he has published widely within these research topics (articles, book chapters and encyclopaedia entries in peer reviewed journals and anthologies). Apart from SLiCA he is currently engaged in a number of research projects as co PI or lead author: ‘ARCTICCHALLENGE’; ‘The Economy of the North (ECONOR) III’ and ‘The impact of a changing climate as well as changes in institutional arrangements, demographic and socio-economic changes – the  household economies of hunters and fishermen’. He has been serving on the editorial board of Social Indicator ResearchSIR (An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of Life Measurement) since 2004.    

 

Mark Nuttall

Professor
Institute of Social Science, Economics & Journalism 
Department of Social Sciences, Economics & Business
E-mail: manu@uni.gl

    

Nuttall Photo (1)

 

Mark Nuttall is Professor and Henry Marshall Tory Chair of Anthropology at the University of Alberta, and Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is also Professor of Climate and Society at the Greenland Climate Research Centre/Greenland Institute of Natural Resources and Ilisimatusarfik/University of Greenland, where he directs the Climate and Society research programme. He has carried out extensive research in Greenland, Alaska, Canada, Finland and Scotland and current work focuses on climate change and extractive industries in Greenland and the Arctic. He is co-PI of the EU-funded project ICE-ARC (Ice, Climate, and Economics—the Arctic Region in Change). His latest books are The Scramble for the Poles: the geopolitics of the Arctic and Antarctic (Polity, 2016; co-authored with Klaus Dodds) and Anthropology and Climate Change: from actions to transformations (Routledge, 2016; co-edited with Susan Crate). 

 

Sarah Mackie (visiting researcher)

PhD candidate
Newcastle Law School 

    

Sarah Mackie Photo

 

Sarah Mackie is a PhD candidate at Newcastle Law School in the United Kingdom. She is writing a thesis on the subject of comparative environment law in the Arctic, considering the role of the courts in environmental protection in the Arctic regions of Europe and North America. In conducting her research, Sarah has held posts as a visiting researcher at the University of Lapland, Harvard Law School and the University of Greenland. Sarah holds a law degree from St John’s College, Cambridge University and an LL.M in Environmental Law from Newcastle University. Prior to beginning her PhD, Sarah worked as an extern for Trustees for Alaska, an environmental public interest law firm based in Anchorage, Alaska and was Judicial Assistant to the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales. Sarah is qualified as a solicitor in England and Wales and teaches Public Law and Contract Law at Newcastle Law School.